Best answer: What advantages did the United States have in the Mexican American War?

Better Resources. The American government committed plenty of cash to the war effort. The soldiers had good guns and uniforms, enough food, high-quality artillery and horses and just about everything else they needed. The Mexicans, on the other hand, were totally broke during the entire war.

What advantages did the US have over Mexico in the Mexican war quizlet?

The advantages that the United States had were that it was wealthier, larger, and more populous than Mexico. America also had industries to supply it with arms and ammunition as well as a larger and better navy and more advanced artillery. Lastly, the United States had well trained officers.

How did the United States win the war against Mexico?

The Mexican-American War was formally concluded by the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. The United States received the disputed Texan territory, as well as New Mexico territory and California. … The United States Army won a grand victory. Although suffering 13,000 killed, the military won every engagement of the war.

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What did America gain from the Mexican war quizlet?

That the US got the Mexican Cession and the disputed territory of Texas and in return paid Mexico $15 million.

Why did the United States win the Mexican-American War quizlet?

It was started by a dispute by the Rio Grande and the Nueces River. The Mexican- American war was the first battle on foreign soil, fueled by the desire of James K. Polk to fulfill Manifest Destiny. The Americans won the Mexican-American War, gaining the Mexican Cession and Mexico lost about one third of its territory.

Who benefited from the Mexican-American War?

What did the U.S. gain by winning the Mexican-American War? Under the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which settled the Mexican-American War, the United States gained more than 500,000 square miles (1,300,000 square km) of land, expanding U.S. territory by about one-third.

Why America was not justified in the Mexican-American War?

Three main reasons America was unjustified in going into war with Mexico were that President James k. Polk provoked it, America’s robbery of Mexico’s land and the expansion of slavery. … That is why America was unjustified to go into war with Mexico.

What did the US lose in the Mexican American War?

It also helped solve its financial crisis, as the United States paid $15 million to Mexico ($420 million today). But, under the treaty, Mexico lost a full third of its territory, including nearly all of present-day California, Utah, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico.

What are 3 effects of the Mexican American War?

The war affected the US, specifically Texas, and Mexico. For Mexico, there was loss of life, economic ruin, and huge damage to property. For the US, they gained huge new pieces of land.

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Why was the US army so successful in battle during the Mexican American War?

Better Resources. The American government committed plenty of cash to the war effort. The soldiers had good guns and uniforms, enough food, high-quality artillery and horses and just about everything else they needed. The Mexicans, on the other hand, were totally broke during the entire war.

Which was an impact of the Mexican American War quizlet?

An effect of the Mexican American war is Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. What is it? Mexico gave up California and New Mexico. An effect of the Mexican American war is The Gadsden Purchase.

What was the main outcome of the Mexican war quizlet?

Mexico lost the war and signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, giving up the territory known as the Mexican Cession (which now includes California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico).

What were the long lasting effects of the Mexican American War?

The treaty effectively halved the size of Mexico and doubled the territory of the United States. This territorial exchange had long-term effects on both nations. The war and treaty extended the United States to the Pacific Ocean, and provided a bounty of ports, minerals, and natural resources for a growing country.